Lindsay Thomas Robinson’s ‘Central Dental’ Is A Scathing Commentary on the US Heathcare System – Movie Review

Ah, the dentist. As far as medical professionals go, this is the one that many people fear the most. But the fear is more that just the physical pain of having a tooth fixed… it also comes when you get presented with a massive bill. In America, if you have money or great insurance, you get the privilege of keeping your own teeth. If not, well… In director Lindsay Thomas Robinson’s (How to Learn Anything) new short film, Central Dental, these themes are brilliantly explored.

Synopsis:

Lewis finds himself at a sketchy 24 hour dental clinic after having his tooth knocked out.

Poor Lewis. He gets beat up and a tooth knocked out at the start of the film. Fortunately, he does so right in front of a 24 hour dental clinic. What luck, right? They even agree to settle the bill after the treatment. How much could it possibly cost?

I loved this little short a lot. Shot in dark, moody black and white, it felt very much like an early David Lynch film. The acting is just terrific, and I especially adore Adam Drory as the hapless Lewis.

One massive pet peeve I have is that health insurance doesn’t cover teeth, even though they are connected very firmly—or not, in Lewis’ case—to the body. Central Dental points out this flaw as well as highlighting the idea that maybe everyone should just be allowed to keep their teeth without it costing a fortune. Or something far worse.

One thing I’d like to point out: As a formal dental hygienist, they certainly got a lot right, but there were a few details they fudged on. I can let them slide because this is, after all, a horror film.

I recommend that everyone put their squeamish tendencies aside and check Central Dental out!

About Christine Burnham

When not writing, Christine Burnham is watching TV, Horror films, reading, cooking, and spending time with her menagerie of animals.

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